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The first in-depth look at baseball's nirvana -- a lyrical history of pitching perfection. There have been only fourteen perfect games pitched in the modern era of baseball; the great Cy Young fittingly hurled the first, in , and David Cone pitched the most recent, in Fourteen in , games: The odds are staggering. When it does happen, however, the whole baseball world marvels at the combination of luck and skill, and the pitcher himself gains a kind of baseball immortality. Five years ago, Michael Coffey witnessed such an event at Yankee Stadium, and the experience prompted this expansive look at the history of these unsurpassable pitching performances.

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This post includes spoilers for the entirety of Get Out. One of the most popular promotional images of the new horror-comedy film Get Out is that of a young black man staring straight at the camera. As the protagonist of Get Out , Chris Washington tells a great deal of the story using only his eyes. This is of course a testament to the excellent work of the actor, Daniel Kaluuya, who plays him.

Throughout the film, the director Jordan Peele uses the sense of sight to amplify imbalances of power and control—imbalances often drawn along racial lines. Notably, Chris is a photographer, and apparently a very good and respected one.

The trailer for Get Out hinted at one major way cameras might matter in the film. It was hard not to watch that scene without thinking of how important camera phones and video recordings have been for many African Americans experiencing police violence—especially in light of an earlier scene in which Chris is the apparent target of racial profiling by an officer.

Cameras, Get Out suggests somewhat plainly, have the power to reveal. But like almost every moment of calm in the film, the scene is later revealed to be a big lie.

An old TV before him flickers on, and who else is there but Jim Hudson, lying in what looks like an operating room. Jim tells Chris the true nature of the mysterious process the Armitages are subjecting him to: transplantation. Why black people? He has loftier, artistic reasons. I want those things you see through. In other words, I want to look at the world through your eyes. Still, over the other bodily senses, vision has long been the most intuitive metaphor for discussing subjective experience.

But Get Out cleverly takes these tropes and uses them to unique, thought-provoking ends: to probe the very real anxieties produced by racism. Get Out works perfectly well as a wildly entertaining scare-fest. We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters theatlantic. Skip to content.

Sign in My Account Subscribe. The Atlantic Crossword. The Print Edition. Latest Issue Past Issues. Universal Pictures Link Copied. Lenika Cruz is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic , where she covers culture. Connect Twitter.

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Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. From The Author: "This visual guide will give you the tools that you'll need to create a barrier in your home for you and the entire family! It's comical, the methods are easily explained and will honestly leave you and your family wanting to read more!

Get Out is a American horror film written and directed by Jordan Peele in his directorial debut. Get Out received praise for its direction and themes, and it was chosen by the National Board of Review , the American Film Institute and Time as one of the top 10 films of the year. It has been featured in multiple listings of the best films of the s.

This post includes spoilers for the entirety of Get Out. One of the most popular promotional images of the new horror-comedy film Get Out is that of a young black man staring straight at the camera. As the protagonist of Get Out , Chris Washington tells a great deal of the story using only his eyes. This is of course a testament to the excellent work of the actor, Daniel Kaluuya, who plays him.

Addressing both men and women, novelist and nonfiction author French Abingdon's provides an insider's view of what drives men away from their partners and what both parties can do about it. Read full review. A graduate of Stanford University with a degree in English and of Northwestern University with a master s in journalism, Michael French is the author of twenty-four books: adult and young adult fiction, art criticism, biographies, adaptations, and gender studies. A native of Los Angeles, he also is a successful businessman, an avid high-altitude mountain trekker, a world traveler to developing countries, an activist, and, with his wife, Patricia, a philanthropist raising money for programs aiding teachers in Santa Fe, N. Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search. Michael French. Experts in the fields of gender issues and male-female relationships are heralding this groundbreaking work by Michael French as a major contribution to understanding the complex love relationship between a man and a woman. If you are a woman, read this book to find out why your man fell out of love with you.

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TURNS OUT IT'6 A LITTLE HARD YOU'RE RIGHT TO WALK WHEN ON TIME. BIG euv. Eg'zwafl'sggflgEfing FINDING A HAT. " '. a THAT LOOKE THAT COOL DID IT JUST GET DARKER IN HERE OF ALL A SLIDDEN? LOOK, GUYS-I.

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